Publications

Publications by Great Hollow Staff

1)  Seewagen, C.L., D.A. Cristol, and A. Gerson. 2016. Mobilization of mercury from lean tissues during simulated migratory fasting in a model songbird.  Scientific Reports 6:25762.  (Full text)

2)  Seewagen, C.L. and M. Newhouse. 2017. Passage dates, energetic condition, and age distribution of irruptive Pine Siskins at a reclaimed landfill in the New Jersey Meadowlands. Northeastern Naturalist 24(2):201-208. (Full text)

3)  Seewagen, C.L. and M. Newhouse. 2018. Mass changes and energetic condition of grassland and shrubland songbirds during autumn stopovers at a reclaimed landfill in the New Jersey Meadowlands. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 130(2):377-384. (Full text)

4)  Seewagen, C.L. 2018. The threat of global mercury pollution to bird migration: potential mechanisms and current evidence. Ecotoxicology. DOI:10.1007/s10646-018-1971-z. (Full text)

5)  Seewagen, C.L. 2018. Chapter 3: Aquatic Resources. Pp. 13-18 in: Natural Resource Inventory Report and Recommendations for Sherman, Connecticut 2018. Sherman Conservation Commission, Town of Sherman, Connecticut. (Full text)

6)  Seewagen, C.L. 2018. Chapter 6: Wildlife and Critical Habitats. Pp. 29-32 in: Natural Resource Inventory Report and Recommendations for Sherman, Connecticut 2018. Sherman Conservation Commission, Town of Sherman, Connecticut. (Full text)

7)  Gerson, A.R., D.A. Cristol, and C.L. Seewagen. 2019. Environmentally relevant methylmercury exposure reduces the metabolic scope of a model songbird. Environmental Pollution 246(2019):790-796. (Full text)

8) Seewagen, C.L., Y. Ma, Y.E. Morbey, and C.G. Guglielmo. 2019. Stopover departure behavior and flight orientation of spring-migrant yellow-rumped warblers (Setophaga coronata) experimentally exposed to methylmercury. Journal of Ornithology 160:617-624 (Full text)

9) Clark, R. and C.L. Seewagen. 2019. Invasive Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) is associated with simplified branch-dwelling and leaf-litter arthropod communities in a New York forest. Environmental Entomology, in press.

 

Publications by External Researchers

Russo, N.J., C.S Elphick, N.P. Havill, and M.W. Tingley. 2019. Spring bird migration as a dispersal mechanism for the hemlock woolly adelgid. Biological Invasions, in press. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-019-01918-w

 

Great Hollow Research in the News

“It’s a no-brainer: migrants mobilize mercury during flight”

“Mercury-ridden songbirds get an extra jolt during migration”

“Mercury contamination could do big harm to migrating birds”

“Mercury pollution threatens to impair the ability of birds to migrate”

“Global mercury pollution threatens to impact the energy metabolism of birds”

“Mercury exposure found to alter the migration behavior of birds”